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SAMUEL C. RAMER
Associate Professor
Ph.D., Columbia, 1971

Samuel C. Ramer is a historian of modern Russia. His research and teaching are devoted to problems in Russia's political, social, and cultural history.

Research Interests
My research examines the conflicts and dilemmas that medical practitioners in Russia encountered in their efforts to provide an effective system of health care delivery for the peasantry in the countryside. The conflicts in the medical world of the late tsarist period provide an excellent vantage point from which to examine the broader social and political problems that Russia faced during a revolutionary age.

Teaching Interests
Most of my courses explore some dimension of the Russian historical experience in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. I also offer an survey lecture course on Russian history from its conventional beginning in the ninth century through the present day.


SELECTED PUBLICATIONS
"Meditations on Urban Identity: Odessa/Odesa and New Orleans" (2008)    
In Samuel C. Ramer and Blair A. Ruble, eds., Place Identity, and Urban Culture: Odesa and New Orleans (Kennan Institute for Advanced Russian Study of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Occasional Paper #301, 2008): 1-7.
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"Remembering Joseph Brodsky" (2012)    
Journal of Modern Russian History and Historiography 5 (2012): 159-194.
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"Shestidesiatniki": A Review Article (2010)    
Journal of Modern Russian History and Historiography 3 (2010): 233-255.
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FELLOWSHIPS AND AWARDS
Director, LEH Teacher Institute for Advanced Study: Summer, 2005    
"Poetry and Power: The Genius of Alexander Pushkin"
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COURSES
RUSSIAN HISTORY, 1825-PRESENT (HISE-2250)    
This survey lecture course examines the major transformations that have occurred in Russia since 1825: the emancipation of the serfs and the Great Reforms during the 1860s; rapid industrialization during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; the Russian revolutions of 1905 and 1917; the emergence of a new, Soviet system following the victory of the Red Army in the Civil War; the rise of Stalin and the nature of the Stalin regime; the Nazi invasion in 1941 and the suffering and ultimate victory that followed; the onset of the Cold War; the decline of mass terror following Stalin's death; Soviet politics, society, and economy during the post-Stalin era; Gorbachev's attempts at reform under perestroika; the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991; the social and political transformations that have occurred in Russia since 1991.

LITERATURE AND SOCIETY IN RUSSIA, 1800-1917 (HISE-3270)    
Seminar on literature and society in Russia from the time of Pushkin until the Russian Revolution. Readings examine the unusually prominent role that literature and writers played in the broader political and social life of the country.

LITERATURE AND SOCIETY IN RUSSIA, 1917-1991 (HISE-3280)    
Seminar on the relationship between literature and society in the Soviet period. Readings for the course range from source documents on the administration of literature and the arts in the Soviet Union to individual works of literature that had particular social and political resonance. Important questions in the course include the Soviet regime's concerns with literacy, mass media, and propaganda; Stalin's mobilization of writers as the "engineers of human souls", the development of the doctrine of "socialist realism", and literature as a contested field in the post-Stalin era.

STALIN'S RUSSIA, 1924-1953 (HISE 6511)    
A seminar on the Soviet Union under Stalin that examines the nature of Stalin's rule, the goals and costs of his programs of collectivization and industrialization, the organization and impact of political terror under Stalin, the Soviet experience in the Second World War, and finally the dawn of the Cold War during Stalin's last years.

IN STALIN'S SHADOW: THE SOVIET UNION, 1953-1991 (HISE-6512)    
A seminar on the post-Stalin period, culminating in the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. The dominant theme of the course is the tension between the Soviet regime's effort to end Stalin's political terror and the same regime's commitment to maintaining a strong degree of political, social, and economic control during the Cold War era. Below find some of the issues the course addresses:  [more...]

HISTORY OF THE JEWS IN RUSSIA, 1772-1991 (HISE-6513)    
A seminar on the history of the Jews in Russia from the First Partition of Poland in 1772 through to the beginning of the twenty-first century.

CURRICULUM VITAE
Samuel C. Ramer. Curriculum Vitae    
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CONTACT INFORMATION

Office:Hebert 119
Hours:MWF 2:00 - 3:00 or by appointment
Phone:(504) 862-8604
Email:ramer@tulane.edu
Students with questions should feel free to contact me by e-mail.

WHAT'S NEW

RUSSIAN HISTORY, 1825-PRESENT (HISE-2250)  
This survey lecture course examines the major transformations that have occurred in Russia since 1825: the emancipation of the serfs and the Great Reforms during the 1860s; rapid industrialization during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; the Russian revolutions of 1905 and 1917; the emergence of a new, Soviet system following the victory of the Red Army in the Civil War; the rise of Stalin and the nature of the Stalin regime; the Nazi invasion in 1941 and the suffering and ultimate victory that followed; the onset of the Cold War; the decline of mass terror following Stalin's death; Soviet politics, society, and economy during the post-Stalin era; Gorbachev's attempts at reform under perestroika; the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991; the social and political transformations that have occurred in Russia since 1991.


STALIN'S RUSSIA, 1924-1953 (HISE 6511)  
A seminar on the Soviet Union under Stalin that examines the nature of Stalin's rule, the goals and costs of his programs of collectivization and industrialization, the organization and impact of political terror under Stalin, the Soviet experience in the Second World War, and finally the dawn of the Cold War during Stalin's last years.

Department of History
Tulane University
6823 St. Charles Ave.
115 Hebert Hall
New Orleans, LA 70118
Phone: 504-865-5162
Fax: 504-862-8739
Email: pollock@tulane.edu
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